Breaking the Cycle – Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy – Public Consultations

Breaking the Cycle - Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy

PHOTO: Ministry of Children and Youth Services

When Breaking the Cycle: Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy was launched in 2008, it signaled a bold new vision for a fairer society.

In the first three years of the Strategy, the Ontario government has helped raise approximately 47,000 children and their families out of poverty despite a climate of global economic uncertainty.

The government wants to hear from all Ontarians to develop a renewed Poverty Reduction Strategy, including people who have experienced, or are experiencing poverty, experts in the field, the business community, and other levels of government.

We want to hear what matters to you. Your responses will help inform a renewed Poverty Reduction Strategy for Ontario.

This online survey is part of a broader conversation that is occurring across the province and will remain open until October 2013.

HAVE YOUR SAY BY CLICKING HERE AND COMPLETING THE FORM

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Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage

action-alert

Get ready for September 14th!

September 14th is coming soon — the Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage’s second province-wide day of action for a $14 minimum wage!  This month we’ll be carrying out creative actions outside corporate targets who are board members of powerful lobby groups fighting to keep wages low.  You may be surprised to hear who’s on the list!  Stay tuned as we announce the full list next week!

Actions are being organized in Halton, Hamilton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Peterborough, Sudbury, York Region, Cornwall, London, Toronto and more!   Check out 2 actions happening below.

$14 Minimum Wage Carnival

$14 Minimum Wage Carnival outside Toys “R” Us
Games, marching band and community outreach blitz!

Saturday Sept. 14, 1:00 pm

900 Dufferin Street, Dufferin Mall, Toronto
Meet at the north end of the mall on Dufferin Street.  You won’t be able to miss our banners!

Toys “R” Us made $13.5 billion in sales last year selling toys to kids and their families.

Toys “R” Us says they care about the community they serve. But Toys “R” Us chairs the board of directors of the Retail Council of Canada – an influential lobby group that is wanting to keep wages LOW for Ontario workers.  Help us tell Toys “R” Us that 1 in 7 kids in Ontario live in poverty. If they care about our communities they will support a minimum wage that brings families out of poverty!

More info here

Jane and Finch STREET PARTY for a $14 minimum wage!

Join Jane Finch Action Against Poverty (JFAAP) and allies
Saturday September 14, 2013, 12 to 4 pm

Southeast corner of Jane-Finch intersection,
Support the campaign to raise the minimum wage.
• Food
• Entertainment
• Free t-shirts*, buttons, and prizes (* While supplies last)

More info here:

Tell us what you are organizing on September 14th!  We’ll share the full list of actions next week!

Take Action!

Can you organize an action in your community on September 14th?

You don’t need a lot of people to make a big impact. Get in touch with the campaign for support with materials and action ideas at raisetheminimumwage@gmail.ca or (416) 531-0778, ext. 221

Help send Kathleen Wynne a message

Can’t join an action?  You can still help send a strong message to Premier Kathleen Wynne on September 14th.  Stay tuned for details of an online action on September 14th at www.raisetheminimumwage.ca. Help us spread the word and get 10 of your friends to send a message on September 14th too!

The Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage is coordinated by ACORN, Freedom 90, Mennonite New Life Centre, OCAP, Ontario Campaign 2000, Parkdale Community Legal Services, Put Food in the Budget, Social Planning Toronto, Toronto and York Region Labour Council and the Workers’ Action Centre.

Why Poverty?

Poverty in Canada - TVO Infographic

Poverty in Canada – TVO Infographic

http://ww3.tvo.org/whypoverty/main

Q&A: RAISING THE MINUMUM WAGE

raiseTHEwagehttp://raisetheminimumwage.ca/

2013 Street Needs Assessment

The City of Toronto’s Interim Report on homelessness titled “Street Needs Assessment 2013” estimates there are 5,219 people living on the streets, a 1% increase from 2009. The results are based on more than 2,000 completed surveys, more completed surveys that any previous years, and also the longest SNA survey, at 13 questions, to date.

The survey found more than a third of the outdoor homeless population identified as Aboriginal, up 18% from 2009.

19.3% of homeless youth identified as LGBQT compared with 9.5% identifying as LGBQT among the total homeless population. 15.6% of the outdoor homeless population claimed to have served in the Canadian Forces. Questions about sexual orientation and military service were not asked in previous SNA surveys.

The amount of seniors among the homeless population has more than doubled since 2009 with 10% of the homeless population aged 61 or order. Those aged 51 and older represented 29.1% of the homeless population indicating a trend towards an aging homeless population. Those aged under 21 accounted for 6.5% of the homeless population, down from 8% in 2009.

While there has not been a dramatic change in the overall number of homeless people in the city, the amount of people living outside has gone up by 24% from 2009 to 447 people. 3,970 were estimated to be living out of city-administered shelters. 356 resided at Violence Against Women shelters. 236 were in health and treatment facilities, and 210 were in correctional facilities.

The duration of homelessness depended largely on where they resided, but averaged at about 3 years.

The majority of those surveyed, 93%, said they want permanent housing and 48.7% are on waiting lists for government subsidized houses.

Read the full report HERE.

Partners for Access and Identification (PAID) helps vulnerable people get identification so they can gain access to basic services and find employment. The PAID clinic is at Rexdale Legal every Thursday afternoon. For more details click HERE.