CLEO – Latest Common Questions from Your Legal Rights

Latest Common Questions from Your Legal Rights, a website of legal information for people in Ontario

CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario / Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario)

Latest Common Questions

What if the police stop me on the street and ask me who I am?

Question:
What if the police stop me on the street and ask me who I am?

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Latest Resources

What Happens if My Friend Shoplifts?
This post on the Justice for Children and Youth blog looks at what happens when a young person is caught shoplifting as well as the possible legal consequences for her friend who didn’t report it or try to stop her. The article includes information on Civil Recovery letters as well as what these young people could be charged with under the Criminal Code.

Produced by:
Justice for Children and Youth

Evidence in the Criminal Law
This post on the Justice for Children and Youth blog looks at the law of evidence and the rules that control the proof of facts in legal proceedings. It describes three different forms of evidence including “real evidence,” “documentary evidence,,” and “testimonial evidence” also known as oral evidence.

Produced by:
Justice for Children and Youth

Breaking Down the Myths about Adoption
What are some myths about adoption? This blog takes them on:

Produced by:
Adoption Council of Canada

read more

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About Your Legal Rights

Your Legal Rights is a project of CLEO and is funded by the Law Foundation of Ontario.

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TORONTO STAR: #KnownToPolice

Carding on the Rise Again
The Toronto Star questions Toronto Police Services’ tactics on TCHC property as well as the controversial and racially disproportionate practice of ‘Carding’ in a 3 part feature: #KnownToPolice

PT.1 As criticism poles up so do the police cards

PT.2 One officer, five years: 6600 contact cards

PT.3 Tense times in policing on TCHC property

http://www.thestar.com

 

Project Traveller results in 43 arrests, the seizure of 40 firearms and $3 million in drugs

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GTA police agencies, including officers from Peel, York, Halton, Barrie, Guelph, Windsor, the OPP, RCMP, Toronto Police Services 23 Division, 31 Division, Toronto Anti-Violence Intervention Strategy (TAVIS), and Emergency Task Force (ETF) kicked in doors early this morning in a series of raids that netted 40 firearms, $3 million in drugs, and lead to 43 arrests in Toronto and Windsor, where police agencies there also conducted raids. The raids primarily targeted a cluster of apartment high-rises on Dixon and Mercury Roads.

Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair also made the disclosure that Toronto Police investigators were aware of the video which allegedly shows Mayor Rob Ford smoking crack cocaine weeks before the media got word of it. Police gained knowledge of the video from wipe-taps.

When questioned, Blair also said many of those arrested were of Somali origin, but that everyone would be treated ‘fair and equally’.

The operation was code named ‘Project Traveller’, a joint operation between police agencies, Canada Border Services Agency, and likely the RCMP’s Immigration Task Force which operates out of the Greater Toronto Enforcement Centre at 6900 Airport Road.

http://www.thestar.com/news/crime/2013/06/13/massive_police_raid_launched_in_toronto.html

http://toronto.ctvnews.ca/photo-galleries/police-raids-executed-in-project-traveller-1.1323770

What does it take to convict a cop?

Toronto Star Columnist Rosie DiManno asks the question after Ontario Superior Court Justice M. Gregory Ellis finds Toronto Police Services Constable Glenn Weddell not guilty of the assault of Dorain Barton during the G20 protests in Toronto. Toronto Police Services settled with Barton in a civil suite arising from the same incident.

http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2013/06/03/what_does_it_take_to_convict_a_cop_asks_dimanno.html